Home > Christianity, Faith > Do We Want To Be Well?

Do We Want To Be Well?

The problem with many illnesses is that you can have them and not even know it.

Take high blood pressure.  You can often have it and not even know.  The only way to know it is to measure it.  If it’s high, you can treat it.  Otherwise, you might not even know.

I have sleep apnea.  I hook  myself up to a CPAP machine every night.  If I don’t, I feel miserable the next day.

However, I didn’t know I had it for the longest time.  I knew I snored.  I didn’t really realize how tired and sleepy I was.  My wife was worried about me, so I had a sleep test and, voila’, I was treated for sleep apnea.  Then I realized just how ill I was.

I think that’s the way it before we come to know Christ.  We are sick.  Sin sick.  We just have absolutely no idea about it.

We need to be born again, but we wonder how we can enter our mother’s womb again.

We need to become new creatures, and all we know is the mud we wallow in constantly.

We need to enter the kingdom, but we choose to covet, fornicate, commit adultery and homosexual acts and all manner of other sins.

We need to be well when instead we choose to be sick.

Not well, sickness, is all we know.

Do we want to be well?

 

 

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  1. April 23, 2014 at 6:02 am

    I had knee surgery this past November. I knew my knee was bothering me and wasn’t right but until I had the MRI and the surgery little did I know how much I needed something done. Even as a follower of Christ, it is easy to convince myself I am alright. I need reminded from time to time.

    • April 23, 2014 at 6:05 am

      We like to fool ourselves, don’t we?

    • April 23, 2014 at 11:27 am

      Nearly everyone I’ve met likes to consider themselves healthier than they are, especially medical staff. Regardless of ones beliefs a lot of people don’t know that something is wrong until a doctor shows them.

  2. April 23, 2014 at 9:56 am

    But you should choose to let others be “sick” if they wish right? You can’t and shouldn’t force anyone especially by law to come to get “well” by this definition. no? What was it again, “Render onto Ceaser’s what is his”?

    I do not know why an Almighty Being would choose not to warn us what the consequences of our supposed bad deeds were on Earth.

    • April 23, 2014 at 9:59 am

      No, you, nor I, can force anyone to be well. And He has charged us with His message of telling folks that they are not “well.”

      • April 23, 2014 at 10:35 am

        Than you would be okay with letting my girlfriend and I get married in your town as long as we did not do it in your Church?

    • April 23, 2014 at 10:26 am

      We are warned, repeatedly, by God throughout both Old and New Testaments what the consequences are, AJ. Paul is quite eloquent on the subject, and takes far less ink to get the message across than Isaiah or Jeremiah. As to an illusory “right to be sick”? Larry quotes Christ correctly when he cites the words of Christ to a man who had been laying beside a pool every day for 12 years, and whose excuse for not having received the miraculous healings that others had experienced there was that there was no one to help him.

      If you want to stay sick, is it your choice? Yes. Is it your right? Do you want to be healed is a fair question. How you respond to it makes a difference not only in your life, but in the lives of others who watch you.

      Caesar doesn’t own you unless you sell yourself cheaply, and it isn’t Caesar’s visage stamped on your features.

      • April 23, 2014 at 10:51 am

        It is fair that you think he warns us. But I was specifically does not warn us on Earth clearly. If homosexuality is such a grave sin as all others why does he not clarify his reasoning? Why does he not show us the consequences on Earth, why does he not appear in front of me and tell me why what I am doing is wrong?

        I do not believe I am sick honestly. I believe your comparison fails because Medical Science can detect sickness where you cannot see and show you examples of it, prove it to you easily through X-Rays, slides, notifying you of symptoms you didn’t know where symptoms.etc. With Religion you only have their word that you are sick and they can show you little but what they wrote to “prove” it.

        Caesar doesn’t own me, but neither does Christ or the Church. I choose to be my own leader in life.

      • April 23, 2014 at 1:25 pm

        God doesn’t grade sin on a curve, AJ – man does that, and rather badly, I’m afraid. When I was a practicing addict, I knew something was wrong with me, but I defied anyone and everyone who said so – until I was ready to admit I was beaten, nothing changed. Medical science cannot prove addiction – it can point to the damage caused by it, but since the shortcoming is in the mind, and in the will, there is no test that can display that I was an addict.

        As to being owned? God calls all of us to be His kids – but I know as a parent that I wouldn’t love my kids any less if they were addicts, even though they learned early in life what their mom and dad went through. It would hurt like hell, knowing who they were going to hurt with their behaviors and attitudes, but I also know that I’m powerless to stop them. All I can do is run towards them when I see them coming back home from a long ways off and let them know I love them. That’s what He wants to do with you, and me, and all mankind.

        Leave religion in its box, and be in relationship – for a start, we can talk, yes? 🙂

      • April 23, 2014 at 2:13 pm

        I know a few people who came back from addiction and did not come to religion from it. It seems a little unfair on yourself to credit God for your sacrifices and your triumph in getting out of addiction. Their may not be tests but I’ve known an extremely good way to cure that and it seems to work regardless of what you are religiously.

        Your example of your kids seeing becoming addicts possibly seems to miss the point. my sexuality hurts nobody. Least of all myself, I wasn’t truly happy often in my life until I learned to accept myself.

        Yes we can talk. But I am in a relationship, just not with God.

        Sorry for double post, can’t figure out this blog system.

  3. April 23, 2014 at 1:53 pm

    I know a few people who came back from addiction and did not come to religion from it. It seems a little unfair on yourself to credit God for your sacrifices and your triumph in getting out of addiction. Their may not be tests but I’ve known an extremely good way to cure that and it seems to work regardless of what you are religiously.

    Your example of your kids seeing becoming addicts possibly seems to miss the point. my sexuality hurts nobody. Least of all myself, I wasn’t truly happy often in my life until I learned to accept myself.

    Yes we can talk. But I am in a relationship, just not with God.

  4. April 23, 2014 at 4:10 pm

    I keep thinking about the line from the book Good to Great, “Good is the enemy of great.” As long as we feel we are good or good enough we won’t seek greatness. At least a lot won’t. That’s why so many wait until they’ve hit rock bottom to change or to look for healing.

    • April 23, 2014 at 7:58 pm

      I agree with that but I’d apply that to an idea actually. Tolerance, people feel it is just good enough to feel that you shouldn’t beat people up on the streets or shouting obscenities outside their house for their race, sexuality, creed or whatever they feel it is good enough. Yet in many American states it is still legal to fire somebody for being gay,or not serve them as a public business as a measure of “religious freedom”.

      We should be better than that by now, not just merely tolerate others but actually treat them like equal people. If people want to be better than good enough they can’t stay quiet when that kinda stuff happens or passively accept it no matter their religion.

      • April 23, 2014 at 10:05 pm

        *Not instead of or passively accept it. I can’t edit these posts or delete any.

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